A Gloomy Day

Beech Tree on Gloomy Day

A lone Beech tree with yellow leaves in a forest on a gloomy early spring day.

It’s been a bit gloomy here in Virginia for the last few weeks. Not that unusual for late winter/early spring, but not all that great for the soul. Lack of sunlight can start to really wear you down after a while.

It’s especially frustrating when you have new camera gear to test! After several months of anticipation, by new Fujifilm GFX 50s camera arrived and I took it out with me on a short hike through a wooded park near my home. I was hoping to find some early Bradford Pear or other colorful budding trees, but the only color in this particular stretch of woods came from Beech trees which hold on to their leaves through the winter.

The aspect I like best about the Fuji camera (and this is really the reason I bought it in the first place) is that it can function in a way that almost forces me to slow down and be more contemplative in my approach to photography. I found that by removing the optional digital view finder, the camera functions more like a 4×5 field camera when¬†using the pivoting LCD monitor on the back to compose and focus.

For this image, I hunted around to find a composition that would have a single Beech tree surrounded by otherwise leaf-less trees. I knew the pale-yellow leaves would add a nice contrast against the dark trees in the background and the overcast sky. Once the tree was identified, I walked around to find just the right viewpoint, balancing the placement of the Beech tree with the foreground and background tree trunks.

This scene, being very low in contrast, didn’t really give me any sense of the limitations of this new camera, so I’m still “kicking the tires” on it, so to speak. I have a trip to Arizona coming up soon, however, and I’m sure I’ll have more than enough chances to see how well this camera stacks up to my Nikons.

“Beech Tree on Gloomy Day” was taken with a Fujifilm GFX 50s medium-format digital camera and a Fuji 63mm f/2.8 lens. The exposure was 6/10ths of a second @ f/32, ISO 100.

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